look

Purpose: look at or into a person, thing, direction, or the room in general.
Synonyms: l
NLP Enabled? yes

SYNTAX EXAMPLES
1. look 1. look
2. look <thing> 2. look box
3. look <thing> <specification> 3. look shirt green
4. look <specification> <thing> 4. look green shirt
5. look <n>.<thing> 5. look 2.box
6. look in <thing> 6. look in box
7. look in <thing> <specifier> 7. look in box large
8. look in <specifier> <thing> 8. look in large box
9. look in <n>.<thing> 9. look in 2.box
10. look <direction> 10. look north (or: look n)
11. look <character's> <clothingItem> 11. look Poobah's ring
12. look <character's> <specifier> <clothingItem> 12. look Poobah's class ring
13. look <character's> <n>.<clothingItem> 13. look Poobah's 2.ring
14. look <specifier> <character's> <clothingItem> 14. look tall smoker's shoes
15. look <n>.<character's> <clothingItem> 15. look 2.smoker's shoes

USE:

  1. Use form one to look around the room you're currently in.
  2. Use form two when there's no possible ambiguity, and you want to look at something. In the example, there's exactly one box in the room with you.
  3. Use form three or four when more information is needed to interpret the command - that is, there's more than one possible entity by the same name to which the command could be applied. In the example, you're carrying a green shirt, a cotton shirt, etc. Again, you're looking at the shirt, not inside it.
  4. Use form three or four when more information is needed to interpret the command - that is, there's more than one possible entity by the same name to which the command could be applied. In the example, you're carrying a green shirt, a cotton shirt, etc. Again, you're looking at the shirt, not inside it.
  5. Use form five when there are many instances of <thing> available to look at, and you want to look at one of them in particular.
  6. Use form six when there's no possible ambiguity, and you want to look inside something. In the example, there's exactly one box in the room with you. Note that the box may not be open, and thus you might not be able to see inside. If this is so, you'll be informed.
  7. Use form seven or eight when more information is needed to interpret the command - that is, there's more than one possible entity by the same name to which the command could be applied. In the example, there's a small box inside the current room, and a large one.
  8. Use form seven or eight when more information is needed to interpret the command - that is, there's more than one possible entity by the same name to which the command could be applied. In the example, there's a small box inside the current room, and a large one.
  9. Use form nine when there are many instances of <thing> available to look inside.
  10. Use form ten to look in a particular direction.
  11. Use form eleven to look at an item of clothing or a tattoo worn by a character in the current room.
  12. Use form twelve when a character in the current room wears more than one item of clothing or tattoo describable by <clothingItem>, and you want to look at one of them in particular. In the example, Poobah wears an ivory ring and a class ring, and you want to look at the latter.
  13. Use form thirteen when a character in the current room wears more than one item of clothing or tattoo describable by <clothingItem>, and you want to look at one of them in particular. In the example, Poobah wears several rings, and you want to look at the second among these multiples.
  14. Use form fourteen to look at an item of clothing or a tattoo worn by a character in the current room when there are more than one character present who can be described by <specifier>, and you want to look at one of them in particular.
  15. Use form fifteen to look at an item of clothing or a tattoo worn by a character in the current room when there are more than one character present who can be described by <specifier>, and you want to look at one of them in particular.
  16. Note there are several combinations not listed here, which you can extrapolate from the above. Examples: "look tall smoker's 2.tattoo"; "look 2.guard's ebony ring", etc.

As is typical of most TriadCity commands, Look searches for <thing> in a specific order, starting with the room you're in, then your worn or wielded equipment, then your inventory. So, if there's a box in the room, and a box in your inventory, the command "look box" will look at the one in the room, not your inventory. You'd need to use "look 2.box" for the latter. The possessive apostrophe signifies a special case: it always indicates that you want to look at something worn by another character.

Not every item is necessarily something you can look at. And, there are many conditions which could prevent you from looking at a particular thing: the room could be dark, you could be blinded, etc. The are skills which will improve your ability to see things. As with all commands, the Game Channel will record the outcome of your action.

Because the command is enabled for "natural language" parsing, you can use all kinds of variations and still be understood. "Look at the bag", "show me the bag", "look at the second bag", "look 2nd bag", "l 2.bag", and many others will all do fine. To see inside things you can "look into the bag", "look inside the bag", "show me what's inside the bag" "what's in the bag?", "l in bag" and so on. You can "look to the east, look to the west, look to the one I love the best", so long as you break them up into separate commands: "look to the east", "look to the west", "look to the one i love the best." You can "look back, on the track, for my little green bag", "papa's got a brand new bag" too. OK, kidding about the last two.